Topic Fourteen: Data

Desired Results

Transfer:

1. Makes sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
4. Model with mathematics.
5. Use appropriate tools strategically.
6. Attend to precision.
7. Look for and make use of structure.
8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
Established Goals:
  • 5.MD.2: Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit (1/2, 1/4, 1/8). Use operations on fractions for this grade to solve problems involving information presented in line plots. For example, given different measurements of liquid in identical beakers, find the amount of liquid each beaker would contain if the total amount in all the beakers were redistributed equally.
  • 5.G.2: Represent real-world and mathematical problems by graphing points in the first quadrant of the coordinate plane, and interpret coordinate values of points in the context of the situation.

Pre-Requisite Standards:
  • 4.MD.4. Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit (1/2, 1/4, 1/8). Solve problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions by using information presented in line plots. For example, from a line plot find and interpret the difference in length between the longest and shortest specimens in an insect collection.

I Can Statements:
I can make a line plot to display data sets of measurements in fractions.
I can use fraction operations to solve problems involving information presented on a line plot.
I can graph and interpret points in the first quadrant of a coordinate plane.
Big Ideas:
  • Data Collection and Representation: Some questions can be answered by collecting and analyzing data, and the question to be answered determines the data that needs to be collected and how best to collect it. Data can be represented visually using tables, charts, and graphs. The type of data determines the best choice of visual representation.
  • Practices, Processes, and Proficiencies: Mathematics content and practices can be applied to solve problems.
Essential Questions:
  • How can line plots be used to represent data and answer questions?
  • How can numbers be used to describe certain data sets?
Students will know...
  • Each type of graph is most appropriate for certain kinds of data. A line plot organizes data on a number line and is useful for showing visually how a set of data is distributed.
  • Some questions can be answered using a survey. An appropriately selected sample can be used to make predictions about a population. Sample size is one factor that determines how closely the sample mirrors the population.
  • Mathematical explanations can be given using words, pictures, numbers, or symbols. A good explanation should be correct, simple, complete, and easy to understand.

Vocabulary:data, frequency table, line plot, outlier, sample, survey
Students will be skilled at...
  • Drawing line plots, interpreting points, and recognizing outliers.
  • Collecting data and recording data in frequency tables and line plots, then interpreting results.
  • Making a line plot from data in a frequency table.
  • Learning how to use the information in a line plot to solve problems involving data.
  • Writing math explanations that relate to line graphs that show data changing over time.

Assessment Evidence

Performance Assessment:
Other Evidence:

Learning Plan

Learning Activities:
13-1: Each type of graph is most appropriate for certain kinds of data. A line plot organizes data on a number line and is useful for showing visually how a set of data is distributed.
13-2: Some questions can be answered using a survey. An appropriately selected sample can be used to make predictions about a population. Sample size is one factor that determines how closely the sample mirrors the population.
13-3: Each type of graph is most appropriate for certain kinds of data. A line plot organizes data on a number line and is useful for showing visually how a set of data is distributed.
13-4:Some questions can be answered using a survey. An appropriately selected sample can be used to make predictions about a population. Sample size is one factor that determines how closely the sample mirrors the population.
13-5: Mathematical explanations can be given using words, pictures, numbers, or symbols. A good explanation should be correct, simple, complete, and easy to understand.
Resources:

Problem of the Month:
Pick a Pocket

Centers:
Fractions on a Line Plot
Sacks of Flour
Geometric Shapes on the Coordinate Grid